No Risk High Reward Response to a Job Rejection
by Tommy Leung on April 25th, 2018

Have you ever come across a job that you just loved? You like the company. The job is something you want to do. And you are motivated to put in the effort to be great at the work. All of this comes through in your interview but you get rejected anyway. The reasons can be wide and varied. From one of the interviewers disliking your personality to just not having the exact skillset the company is looking for. It is disappointing. The job felt perfect. What do you do after that?

2 Surprising Life Lessons from Ender's Game
by Tommy Leung on April 18th, 2018

Reading is a habit I developed in childhood. I've always loved libraries and book stores. I remember spending summers reading books like the Indian in the Cupboard. I also borrowed books about finding ghosts and drawing comics. The library was a world of infinite knowledge. I could learn anything I wanted once I found a book about it. My favorite fiction is Ender’s Game and it teaches a surprising number of life lessons.

How to Find Clarity by Thinking the Opposite
by Tommy Leung on April 11th, 2018

One of my favorite books of all time is short and irregular-sized with more pictures than words. It is not a children’s book. The book is Whatever You Think Think The Opposite by Paul Arden. Doing things differently than what was common always came naturally to me. One of the first things I try when I need to be creative is to think the opposite.

How My Greyhound Overcame an Impossible Fear
by Tommy Leung on April 4th, 2018

Greyhounds are a unique breed of dog as pets. Their whole life before retirement is about racing. They live in a kennel with many other greyhounds. They are never alone. They don’t know about stairs, elevators, traffic, or other norms of life outside the racetrack. Adapting to life as a pet is a big change. When I got my greyhound, Otis, he was deathly afraid of elevators.

Dealing with Data Privacy in the Facebook Age
by Tommy Leung on March 28th, 2018

A few years ago I decided to eliminate as many Google products from my life as possible. My default search engine changed to DuckDuckGo. I moved off of Gmail and paid for private email. Instead of the Chrome browser I switched to Safari. I didn’t quit Google. Many of their products are excellent and their ability to reduce costs—sometimes to zero—is a net benefit for human kind. So why did I reduce my use of Google products?

A Simple Yet Radical Way to Become More Awesome
by Tommy Leung on March 21st, 2018

I have a morning routine. You probably do too. Mine had been about the same for years: I would have coffee and read the news. It started with RSS feeds. Then Apple released the News app and I switched. I considered reading the news and staying up to date on current events something that smart and informed people did. Like a habit for successful people. If I wasn't smart then I could at least be informed. So I spent about an hour reading the news every morning.

The Day a Homeless Person in Denver Tried to Rob Me
by Tommy Leung on March 14th, 2018

Like most New Yorkers I rode the subways. There is a rotating cast of panhandlers who repeat their sob stories as they pass through the train cars asking for money. Now I'm in Denver, Colorado and there are some homeless people who mill around my neighborhood. They don’t generally bother you or ask for money but one of them followed me and it almost ended in blows.

My Surprising Realization From Year One as an Entrepreneur
by Tommy Leung on March 7th, 2018

It was December 2017 and I was having a bad feeling in my gut. I had left my six-figure job to pursue my dream of starting a business. A business making video games. It was a childhood dream so I had to try. But several months in and I just knew I was doing something wrong.

A Daring Framework for Living a Brave Life
by Tommy Leung on February 28th, 2018

The end of High School is a unique time in life where we are forced to make a decision that often defines the rest of our lives. We make this decision clinically with much thought and attention to future risks and rewards. But is it the best way to make this decision? Is there another approach that guides us through the rest of life that might do a better job?